🌪 Use Multiple Choice Components to Filter an Inline List

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@Robert_Petitto something special? Seems like you already shown multiple choice filtering many times

Yes. This one involves only ONE inline list. No need to create multiple inline lists with visibility conditions.

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@Robert_Petitto wow, intriguing

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ohh so simple) I hated making many inline lists, but now you give a solution. Thanks!

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Cute

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Useful trick for using new single values powerful capabilities …

Thanks @Robert_Petitto

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Thank you @Robert_Petitto

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Y-O-U A-R-E T-H-E M-A-N :partying_face: Booooooom

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Thank you for tutorial! This will be really useful.

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Why don t you use the screen filtering?? It is easier, no ? @Robert_Petitto

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I think the problem with filtering by screen values is that you can’t account for when a user picks a blank filter. Picking a gender of blank for example would only look for students with a blank gender instead of including all students. Screen filters are definitely nice in some cases, but if filters can be optionally chosen, then you need to do what @Robert_Petitto did using logic in the sheet.

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Exactly! Using Screen filtering alone works really well when the choice components are required. But even so, before the user selects anything, the user specific value columns are empty and you have to account for that somehow. The only way to do that is to create a second inline list with visibility conditions.

The method I suggest is to do your conditionality checks in the Glide Data Editor in combination with screen filtering as seen in the video. So simple!

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Thanks very much for this tutorial. I’ve been doing this whole process differently and, though it worked, it was clunky and required multiple inline lists. This is so simple and (now) obvious.

A+

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Hi @Robert_Petitto… I’m trying to use your method to replace the way that I was previously doing this, but had a question. My previous method allowed me to easily rollup the results of the various template columns that the choice selections would generate. That is, I could figure out how many results were displayed in the list of filtered results. It’s more for esthetics than anything else, but it has been very useful to quickly see how many records the filters bring back.

Do you know of a simple way to add this type of rollup to your method above to present users with the number of results that are generated after applying one (or all) of the choices?

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Hey @shchc happy glideversary!!!

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I think you know already how many filters you have, so a setup like this would work.

Assuming you have 5 filter categories, then the benchmark value is 5.

Make a math column summing up all your If Then Else columns, if True doesn’t work then 1 should. Only those with 5 will be shown and you can add a relation - rollup on top of that math column to know how many 5s are there.

Does that make sense?

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Hmm that makes sense, but only works when all the choices are selected — I’d like to be able to leave the choices as optional so that one choice may have a 0 value and the math column would compute it as 4 instead of 5, but I’d still want that shown since it’s the result I was looking for.

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I think I’m picking up what you’re putting down:

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first off thanks for the shoutout! Second… 4XdUSIQ

So simple… it’s all about the different ways you can think of doing things. This way is as simple as the initial tutorial and really brings it all together for me. So much appreciated. Take care.

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